Gym Kit…. I’ve got some more…..

t2Now don’t get me wrong, I enjoy free things and for the gym sessions we do get the offer a t-shirt, but most times I don’t take them, being too fat, and also the t-shirts being in cotton. I tend to go for a sporting top which invariably as poly in nature and just wash and wear. Thinking about an up and coming holiday I thought it might be nice to get a couple for working out, which i will then have to do to make the effort of getting the T-shirt made.

As ever, I went bright, but I actually like the gray, even if it wasn’t what I ordered…. the orange one is less red than the image suggests. so hey ho…. the next steps is to buy no more gym kit!

 

Cheers Steve

 

Just been sent this challenge…I would be dead…

 

Effectively as hard as you can for 2km….

http://log.concept2.com/rankings/2016/rower/2000?weight=H&gender=M

7796 TOTAL PEOPLE 7:46.7 AVERAGE

Percentiles

90th 75th 50th 25th
Result 6:39.1 7:00.6 7:33.1 8:13.6
Pace 1:39.7 1:45.1 1:53.2 2:03.4

2016 2000m Indoor Rower Rankings

Weight: H | Gender: M | Ages: All | Country: All | All Results | Adaptive: No

Pos. Name Age Country Time Type Verified
1 Mohamed Sbihi 27 GBR 5:41.8 I Race
2 Matthieu Androdias 25 FRA 5:46.8 I Race
3 Sam Townsend 30 GBR 5:47.6 I Race
4 Charles Lambert 18 AUS 5:48.3 I No
4 Graham Benton 42 GBR 5:48.3 I Race
6 Paul Bennett 26 GBR 5:48.5 I Race
7 Axel Dickinson 25 NZL 5:49.0 I No
7 Will Satch 26 GBR 5:49.0 I Race
7 Romain Delachaume 27 FRA 5:49.0 I Race
10 James Letten 22 USA 5:49.4 I Race
11 Hugo Boucheron 22 FRA 5:50.0 I Race
12 Benoit Brunet 24 FRA 5:50.4 I Race
13 Cedric Berrest 30 FRA 5:51.1 I Race
14 Benoit Baratin 25 FRA 5:51.3 I Race
15 George Nash 26 GBR 5:52.0 I Race
16 Alex Gregory 31 GBR 5:53.2 I Race
17 Germain Chardin 32 FRA 5:53.9 I Race
18 Matt Gotrel 26 GBR 5:54.7 I Race
19 Oscar Alonso 26 ESP 5:55.7 I Race
20 Andriy Pryveda 30 UKR 5:56.5 I Race

So time to get off ones ass….

figure_shadw_boxing_300_wht_11993it’s time to put it out there, I’ve been lax of late. I’ve been broken, had colds, felt rubbish and old habits have come back to haunt me, so it’s time to do something (again again!). There is a motivation this time, I’ve got a few weeks to get life in order before wandering off to the USA for my road trip. All being well, the next six weeks then should set me up well to be fighting fit.

A few little scores to settle along the way. The fitness test needs a good beating. I will beat @jinkstevens  at rowing even if it kills me! I also need to up the PMA as its slipped of late, and I owe that to the others!

Thats it, short and sweet, and done.

Steve

 

So the doms…

Well it seems that I escaped relatively lightly from the deadlifting which is great and proabably also reflects upon the light weights that were done (don’t judge me!). A little bit of DOMS in the shoulders but nothing bad, and infairness, I’ve had a better degree of flexibility since doing the exercises!

Back tonight for the sickner… which from memory isn’t fun as you exercise whilst one team row to a given random distance and you amrap the exercise you are on!

Wish me luck….

Ta

CKyTWcoUEAAlN5k

DOMS…

Delayed onset muscle soreness

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), also called muscle fever, is the pain and stiffness felt in muscles several hours to days after unaccustomed or strenuous exercise.

The soreness is felt most strongly 24 to 72 hours after the exercise.[1][2]:63 It is thought to be caused by eccentric (lengthening) exercise, which causes microtrauma to the muscle fibers. After such exercise, the muscle adapts rapidly to prevent muscle damage, and thereby soreness, if the exercise is repeated.[1][2]:76

Delayed onset muscle soreness is one symptom of exercise-induced muscle damage. The other is acute muscle soreness, which appears during and immediately after exercise.

Contents

Characteristics

The soreness is perceived as a dull, aching pain in the affected muscle, often combined with tenderness and stiffness. The pain is typically felt only when the muscle is stretched, contracted or put under pressure, not when it is at rest.[2]:63 This tenderness, a characteristic symptom of DOMS, is also referred to as “muscular mechanical hyperalgesia“.[3]

Although there is variance among exercises and individuals, the soreness usually increases in intensity in the first 24 hours after exercise. It peaks from 24 to 72 hours, then subsides and disappears up to seven days after exercise.[2]:63

Cause

The soreness is caused by eccentric exercise, that is, exercise consisting of eccentric contractions of the muscle. Isometric (static) exercise causes much less soreness, and concentric (shortening) exercise causes none.[2]:63

Mechanism

The mechanism of delayed onset muscle soreness is not completely understood, but the pain is ultimately thought to be a result of microtrauma – mechanical damage at a very small scale – to the muscles being exercised.

DOMS was first described in 1902 by Theodore Hough,[4] who concluded that this kind of soreness is “fundamentally the result of ruptures within the muscle”.[2]:63 According to this “muscle damage” theory of DOMS, these ruptures are microscopic lesions at the Z-line of the muscle sarcomere.[5] The soreness has been attributed to the increased tension force and muscle lengthening from eccentric exercise.[6] This may cause the actin and myosin cross-bridges to separate prior to relaxation, ultimately causing greater tension on the remaining active motor units.[6] This increases the risk of broadening, smearing, and damage to the sarcomere. When microtrauma occurs to these structures, nociceptors (pain receptors) within muscle connective tissues are stimulated and cause the sensation of pain.[7]

Another explanation for the pain associated with DOMS is the “enzyme efflux” theory. Following microtrauma, calcium that is normally stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum accumulates in the damaged muscles. Cellular respiration is inhibited and ATP needed to actively transport calcium back into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is also slowed. This accumulation of calcium may activate proteases and phospholipases which in turn break down and degenerate muscle protein.[8] This causes inflammation, and in turn pain due to the accumulation of histamines, prostaglandins, and potassium.[7][9]

An earlier theory posited that DOMS is connected to the build-up of lactic acid in the blood, which was thought to continue being produced following exercise. This build-up of lactic acid was thought to be a toxic metabolic waste product that caused the perception of pain at a delayed stage. This theory has been largely rejected, as concentric contractions which also produce lactic acid have been unable to cause DOMS.[5] Additionally, lactic acid is known from multiple studies to return to normal levels within one hour of exercise, and therefore cannot cause the pain that occurs much later.[7]

Relation to other effects

Although delayed onset muscle soreness is a symptom associated with muscle damage, its magnitude does not necessarily reflect the magnitude of muscle damage.[2]:66–67

Soreness is one of the temporary changes caused in muscles by unaccustomed eccentric exercise. Other such changes include decreased muscle strength, reduced range of motion, and muscle swelling.[2]:66 It has been shown, however, that these changes develop independently in time from one another and that the soreness is therefore not the cause of the reduction in muscle function.[2]:66

Possible function as a warning sign

Soreness might conceivably serve as a warning to reduce muscle activity so as to prevent further injury. However, further activity temporarily alleviates the soreness, even though it causes more pain initially. Continued use of the sore muscle also has no adverse effect on recovery from soreness and does not exacerbate muscle damage.[2]:68 It is therefore unlikely that soreness is in fact a warning sign not to use the affected muscle.[2]:68

Repeated-bout effect

After performing an unaccustomed eccentric exercise and exhibiting severe soreness, the muscle rapidly adapts to reduce further damage from the same exercise. This is called the “repeated-bout effect”.[10]

As a result of this effect, not only is the soreness reduced, but other indicators of muscle damage, such as swelling, reduced strength and reduced range of motion, are also more quickly recovered from. The effect is mostly, but not wholly, specific to the exercised muscle: experiments have shown that some of the protective effect is also conferred on other muscles.[2]:69

The magnitude of the effect is subject to many variations, depending for instance on the time between bouts, the number and length of eccentric contractions and the exercise mode. It also varies between people and between indicators of muscle damage.[2]:69 Generally, though, the protective effect lasts for at least several weeks. It seems to gradually decrease as time between bouts increases, and is undetectable after about one year.[2]:70

The first bout does not need to be as intense as the subsequent bouts in order to confer at least some protection against soreness. For instance, eccentric exercise performed at 40% of maximal strength has been shown to confer a protection of 20 to 60% from muscle damage incurred by a 100% strength exercise two to three weeks later.[2]:73 Also, the repeated-bout effect appears even after a relatively small number of contractions, possibly as few as two. In one study, a first bout of 10, 20 or 50 contractions provided equal protection for a second bout of 50 contractions three weeks later.[2]:70

The reason for the protective effect is not yet understood. A number of possible mechanisms, which may complement one another, have been proposed. These include neural adaptations (improved use and control of the muscle by the nervous system), mechanical adaptations (increased muscle stiffness or muscle support tissue), and cellular adaptations (adaptation to inflammatory response and increased protein synthesis, among others).[2]:74

Prevention

Delayed onset muscle soreness can be reduced or prevented by gradually increasing the intensity of a new exercise program,[11]:112 thereby taking advantage of the repeated-bout effect.

Soreness can theoretically be avoided by limiting exercise to concentric and isometric contractions.[11]:112 But eccentric contractions in some muscles are normally unavoidable during exercise, especially when muscles are fatigued.[2]:63 Limiting the length of eccentric muscle extensions during exercise may afford some protection against soreness, but this may also not be practical depending on the mode of exercise. A study comparing arm muscle training at different starting lengths found that training at the short length reduced muscle damage indicators by about 50% compared to the long length, but this effect was not found in leg muscles.[2]:71

Static stretching or warming up the muscles does not prevent soreness.[12][13] Overstretching can by itself cause soreness.

The use of correctly fitted, medical-grade, graduated compression garments such as socks and calf sleeves during the workout can reduce muscle oscillation and thus some of the micro-tears that contribute to DOMS.[14] Proper nutrition to manage electrolytes and glycogen before and after exertion has also been proposed as a way to ease soreness.[15][16] Consuming more vitamin C may not prevent soreness.[17]

Treatment

The soreness usually disappears within about 72 hours after appearing. If treatment is desired, any measure that increases blood flow to the muscle, such as low-intensity activity, massage, hot baths, or a sauna visit may help somewhat.[11]:112

Immersion in cool or icy water, an occasionally recommended remedy, was found to be ineffective in alleviating DOMS in one 2011 study,[18] but effective in another.[19] There is also insufficient evidence to determine whether whole-body cryotherapy – compared with passive rest or no whole-body cryotherapy – reduces DOMS, or improves subjective recovery, after exercise.[1]

Counterintuitively, continued exercise may temporarily suppress the soreness. Exercise increases pain thresholds and pain tolerance. This effect, called exercise-induced analgesia, is known to occur in endurance training (running, cycling, swimming), but little is known about whether it also occurs in resistance training. There are claims in the literature that exercising sore muscles appears to be the best way to reduce or eliminate the soreness, but this has not yet been systematically investigated.[2]:6

Pushing on through…

 

Not quite to thpushing_up_arrow_300_clr_13228e other side, but through the pain, through the barrier, and through to the otherside. This exercise program has been tough, really tough. Thats probably not

a surprise, but I’ve pushed on. Up the kettle bell, up the slam weight, up the power bag, indeed just up. A few reasons, I am being pushed on by @jinkystevens and jo – for that there is a thanks due I think.

 

sinking_row_boat_300_clr_5491

However, there is a little annoyance at points, and I must conquer the rowing machine – I stroke more, but go less and its got to be technique or strength. Either way I am on it. And I probably need to swear less at chris!

In time I am sure it will get better.

It will….

 

New for this time around is keeping a diary of “what I did” and “how I felt”. It makes for interesting reading so far. It also shows the patterns and trends in the exercises so far.

Right enough for now, little update for which I apologise, I should be better at this. Early start tomorrow, 6:15 session (am) so help me….

 

Steve

 

Ahh the 4th…

Hi All,

Well the 4th means many things:

  1. Back to work
  2. Back to the fitness academy
  3. Traffic
  4. The tunnel
  5. Seeing who left us under restructing

Back to work is easy enough, apart from lack of structure and sleep over the past 2 weeks. Add to tht i am writing this at 1130pm, signs dont look good….

A new six week fitness program is in play along with new food plan. Tomorrow is egg day, meh and yuck!